San Francisco Tropical

There’s been a bit of a blogging lull here in recent weeks, so here’s another placeholder post—some photos from the California Academy of Sciences a few days ago.

I didn’t take too many pictures, but I wanted to see how photos from the dim exhibition halls or through glass and water in the aquarium would come out. For the most part, I was pleasantly surprised, although some of the shadowy lighting—in the frog photos, for example—caused some difficulties.

Stealth Jellyfish

Some young fashion plate may want to consider this color scheme for his or her next fixed gear bike:

Fish of Color

Are you really what you eat? A sampling of objects that have been found in the stomachs of great white sharks:

Omnivorous

To each his own

Inner Circle

6 Responses to “San Francisco Tropical”

  1. Gene says:

    Nice pics! Your camera did well in the low light. My wife and I were just at the Academy of Science after the West Coast Green building conference.

  2. ruth gutmann says:

    I wonder did the great white sharks die as a result of their diet?

    I do love the frogs, the colors shiny, almost as if painted on. The black bird with its dark red head and neck is beautiful.

  3. Amie Wong says:

    Beautiful photos! We’d love to have you share these on our Flickr group if you’re interested. We’re at: http://www.flickr.com/groups/calacademy.

  4. dc says:

    I just found out those frogs are fake. $25 for a ticket and they hoodwink you into photographing fake frogs. Ruth was right—the colors are painted on.

  5. ng says:

    !!! How did you learn that they’re fake?

  6. dc says:

    Someone left a comment on the frog photo at Flickr alerting me, and I looked around a bit on the web to confirm it (there are hundreds of photos of those frogs posted online, all in exactly the same position, and only a small percentage of people seem to realize that they are fake). I assume there was some little notice at the Cal Academy telling visitors that the frogs are fake, but I didn’t see it (the real ones are poisonous, which is presumably why they put fake ones in the open rain forest display).

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